Jewelweed, Nature’s Poison Ivy Care

What’s the big deal?

Jewelweed is an indigenous herb found in the North Eastern United States and thankfully, it is prolific in N.E. Ohio, where we live. It was the Native American Indians who shared their knowledge of the herb’s comforting dermatitis qualities, with European immigrants.  It was our great grandmother who passed this knowledge on to us.

Jewelweed neutralizes the resins of poison ivy and calms the skin inflammation which occurs after plant contact. Poison Ivy resin can contaminate wood brought in for your fireplace. Hunters can suffer from contact with the resin even in the Fall and Winter fields. For this reason I manufacture Meadowlake Farm’s Poison Ivy & Itch Relief, (aka Beepharmacy salve),  year round. Our salve is in constant demand because it works. Its comfort is close to immediate. It can be applied around the clock as needed without side effects and as often as desired.

Poultices and salves from Jewelweed are a folk remedy for bruises, burns, cuts, eczema, and insect bites. Jewelweed blooms May through October in the eastern part of North America from Southern Canada to the northern part of Florida. It is found most often in moist woods, usually near poison ivy or stinging nettle. It is commonly said that wherever you find poison ivy, you are likely to find jewelweed. In a pinch, you can apply jewelweed stem juice over skin exposed to poison ivy, oak or insect bites. However, I personally prefer our salve. Our jewelweed is tinctured and blended with raw honey and beeswax also known for their healing properties.

Give our salve a try! Have it on hand. Keep this soothing comfort an elbow’s length away, before you need it. jewelweed

 

 

 

Orange Jewelweed in blossom. Impatiens capensis

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s